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June 29, 2021 Cosmetic Specials

AlphaRet Chemical Peel One Day Event

Tuesday July 20, 2021.

AlphaRet Chemical Peel $100 ($150 value).

By Appointment only.  Call 817-795-7546 ext. 304 to RSVP.

**The Skinbetter Representative will be here from 9:30 – 11:30 am if you would like to speak with her**

Purchase one (1) SkinBetter chemical peel for $100. Normally $150. Requires $50 deposit to save your spot.

Purchase a package of three (3) SkinBetter chemical peels for $399. Normally $450. Requires $200 deposit to save your spot.

Purchase a package of six (6) Skin Better chemical peels for $750. Normally $900. Also included in the package is travel sizes of SkinBetter Alpharet ($28 value) and SkinBetter Alto ($33 value). AND…something special – a VIP Grab Bag! Requires $300 deposit to save your spot


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March 5, 2021 Clinical Trials

NEW study for ages 9 years and older. 3-week oral antibiotic study for back and/or chest acne. At least 20 lesions are required. Photographs will be taken.

How can you participate?

Inquire about how you can participate in this study today.

TO LEARN MORE ABOUT THE ACNE STUDY, CONTACT:
studies@acderm.com or call 817-795-7546 ext. 339


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March 5, 2021 Clinical Trials

NEW study for adults 18 years and older with a diagnosis of psoriasis. Must have history of at least 6 months on Consyntex or Talz. No prior use of Skyrizi. No investigational drug use within 30 days. No major surgeries within 12 weeks, or major planned surgeries. You are being asked whether you would like to voluntarily participate in a research study of a drug called risankizumab (SkyriziTM).

This research study involves the use of an approved drug called risankizumab (SkyriziTM) to treat moderate to severe psoriasis. This study is being run in approximately 50 research centers in 9 countries and is expected to enroll approximately 250 subjects.

If you decide to participate, you will be in this study for up to 64 weeks. The study comprises 3 periods: There will be a 30-day Screening Period, a 52-week open-label study period and a 20-week follow-up period following the last dose of study drug scheduled at Week 40 visit (weeks 40-52 of the open-label period will also be weeks 1-12 of the follow-up period). The open-label period means that you, your study doctor and AbbVie know that what study treatment you are receiving.

You may need to come in for additional (unscheduled) visits if necessary, as determined by your study doctor. If you are eligible to receive study treatment, you will receive 2 injections of active risankizumab 75 mg (150 mg total dosage) subcutaneously (SC) at Weeks 0 and 4 visits, and then every 12 weeks (q12w) until the last dose at Week 40 visit. At any time, you may choose to discontinue from the study and end study participation early, or your study doctor may discontinue your participation for any reason at any time.

AbbVie is sponsoring this study. Being in this study does not replace your regular medical care. AbbVie may stop this study prematurely, either in its entirety or at any study site, for reasonable cause, provided that written notice is submitted in advance of the intended study stop.


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March 5, 2021 Clinical Trials

Arlington Research Center is looking for children and adults, aged 6 years and up who have eczema, to participate in a clinical research study evaluating an investigational cream. This study includes up to 5 visits for 2 months.

Studies for youth and adults. Must have a history of atopic for at least 3 months for youth 6-17 years of age, and for at least 6 months for adults 18 years and older. Study patients previously on the ARQ-151 are excluded.

How can you participate?

Inquire about how you can participate in this study today.

TO LEARN MORE ABOUT THE INTEGUMENT STUDY, CONTACT:
studies@acderm.com or call 817-795-7546 ext. 339


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March 5, 2021 Clinical Trials

NEW study for adults 18 and older. Topical cream and at-home phototherapy system. Must have facial vitiligo. Subjects with vitiligo on the hands, forearms, or elbows may treat areas in addition to the face with the cream. Begins in mid-March.

How can you participate?

Inquire about how you can participate in this study today.

TO LEARN MORE ABOUT THE VITILIGO STUDY, CONTACT:
studies@acderm.com or call 817-795-7546 ext. 339


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January 25, 2021 Newsletter

Hidradenitis suppurativa (HS) is a little-known disease that causes deep and painful lumps under the skin, usually in the armpits or groin.

Many people mistake the deep lumps for painful pimples or acne cysts. HS can also be misdiagnosed as boils, infected hair follicles (folliculitis), or a sexually transmitted disease.

Because HS is often mistaken for another condition, people can go years without getting the care they need. Some people live with HS for 12 years or longer before getting diagnosed.

Without the right diagnosis and individualized treatment, HS can worsen. What starts out as one or two deep, painful, pimple-like lumps can turn into several lumps. In time, these lumps can break open and leak a foul-smelling liquid. The lumps can continue to return, rupture, and heal.

Patients with hidradenitis suppurativa have a high prevalence of acne vulgaris, research published in Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology shows. Furthermore, the mean age of onset of hidradenitis suppurativa patients is lower when they also have acne vulgaris, the data show.

The prevalence of acne vulgaris was assessed in consecutive new patients with hidradenitis suppurativa referred to the Department of Dermatology at Bispebjerg Hospital in Copenhagen, Denmark.

A total of 302 patients (191 women and 111 men) with a mean age of 39.4 years referred between January 1, 2016 and October 8, 2018 were included in the evaluation.

The overall prevalence of acne vulgaris was 21.2%. Nineteen of the patients with acne vulgaris (29.7%) had hidradenitis suppurativa assessed as Hurley stage I, 39 (60.9%) Hurley stage II and 6 (9.4%) Hurley III. There was no statistical difference in Hurley stage of hidradenitis suppurativa between patients with and without acne.

However, acne vulgaris was associated with a lower age of onset of hidradenitis suppurativa. Those patients with hidradenitis suppurativa and acne vulgaris attending the clinic were significantly younger than those without acne vulgaris (33.8 versus 40.8 years,), and the mean age at onset of hidradenitis suppurativa was significantly lower in patients with acne vulgaris than it was in those without (21.4 versus 27.2 years).

Hidradenitis suppurativa patients with acne vulgaris also had lower levels of plasma inflammatory markers (C-reactive protein [CRP], neutrophils, and neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio [NLR]) than those without acne vulgaris.

Prevalence of acne vulgaris among hidradenitis suppurativa patients was not impacted by the sex of the patient, smoking status, obesity or diagnosis of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). There was also no difference in Dermatology Quality of Life Index (DLQI) and localization of hidradenitis suppurativa between the patients with and without acne vulgaris.

Patients referred for specialized hospital care tended to have a high prevalence of acne vulgaris. Furthermore, hidradenitis suppurativa patients with acne vulgaris tend to have a significantly lower mean age and age at onset of hidradenitis suppurativa compared to hidradenitis suppurativa patients without acne vulgaris. These findings call for greater awareness of this association between acne and HS and for a co-management approach to treatment.

The Danish findings support those of a population-based sample from the United states which found that the prevalence of acne vulgaris was 15.2% among adults with hidradenitis suppurativa, compared to 2.9% in adults without hidradenitis suppurativa.

The US cross-sectional analysis used electronic health records data from a population-based sample of over 55 million patients to identifying adults with acne vulgaris among patients with and without hidradenitis suppurativa.

Prevalence of acne vulgaris in patients with hidradenitis suppurativa was found to be 15.2% (7,315 /48,050), compared to 2.9% (497,360 /16,899,470) for adults without hidradenitis suppurativa. Prevalence of acne vulgaris was greatest among hidradenitis suppurativa patients who were female (16.4%), aged 18-44 years (18.2%), non-white (17.5%), obese (15.5%), and had PCOS (28.7%).

Hidradenitis suppurativa patients had 4.51 times the odds of having acne vulgaris compared to non-HS patients, and the association between hidradenitis suppurativa and acne vulgaris was generally stronger for patients who were male, aged ≥ 65 years, non-whites, and obese.

The association between acne vulgaris and polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is already well established. Recent research has demonstrated that approximately 1 in 11 women with hidradenitis suppurativa also have PCOS. The link among the three conditions is not yet clearly established, as circulating and end organ androgen expression appear to be normal among hidradenitis suppurativa patients.

If you have signs of HS or acne, have your dermatologist examine for both as HS may not be easily recognized by the general public. Dr. Moore’s research team, Arlington Research Center, his screening patients for HS to participate in clinical trials for HS. We also have clinical trials for acne. Contact Arlington Research Center at studies@acderm.com or 817-795-7546 ext. 339 to see if you qualify for an HS clinical trial.

Sources: AAD.org and Dermatology News February 2019


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December 30, 2020 Clinical Trials

If your child has severe eczema, learn how he or she could participate in this research study of an oral study drug for children 6 months to 11 years of age.

The purpose of this study is to examine how the body processes the study drug, evaluate drug safety and assess how the safety and taste hold up (tolerability and palatability) in children (6 months to 11 years old) with severe atopic dermatitis, also known as eczema. The study medication comes in a tablet form or a solution that will be taken by mouth.

WHO MAY PARTICIPATE IN THIS STUDY?
Your child may qualify for this research study, if the following applies to your child:

  • Your child is between 6 months to 11 years old
  • Your child has severe Atopic Dermatitis
  • Your child is experiencing active Atopic Dermatitis symptoms, such as: itchiness, irritated dry skin, redness, etc.

You may receive reimbursement for your time and travel expenses related to study participation.
Please visit http://www.clinicaltrialsandme.com/M16-049 for locations participating in the study.


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December 30, 2020 Clinical Trials

While severe psoriasis affects the skin, causing it to itch and burn, it can also have an emotional impact on adolescents, as well as their parents.

Because of the raised, red, scaly patches on their skin, many adolescents feel ashamed or embarrassed by their condition. These emotions can cause them to not want to hang out with friends, attend school functions, or participate in extracurricular activities.

For parents watching these physical and emotional effects, it’s difficult when other treatments have not been successful in managing their child’s psoriasis.

Because many adolescents and their families struggle with psoriasis, this research study is being conducted to evaluate an investigational drug for severe psoriasis. In this study, researchers want to learn more about the safety and effectiveness of the investigational drug.

The investigational drug has not been approved by any regulatory agency for the treatment of children and adolescents with this condition. It is only available to children and adolescents in research studies like this one.

The results of this study will provide more information about the investigational drug and whether it could one day be approved for children and adolescents with severe plaque psoriasis.

What will happen during this study?

To participate in this study, all patients will go through a screening process to determine if they are eligible. If a patient meets the study requirements, agrees to participation, and has their parents’ permission, they will begin the study.

Patients will receive five subcutaneous injections (needle inserted just beneath the skin) of the investigational drug over the course of 40 weeks. All injections will be given at the study clinic.

Total participation in this study will last up to 65 weeks, which includes approximately 9 study clinic visits for injections of the investigational drug, blood tests, and other assessments, as well as 1 follow-up phone call. Patients who complete participation in this study may be able to take part in a 52-week extension study in which all patients will continue receiving the investigational drug.

What are the benefits and risks related to this study?

It’s possible patients could benefit from study participation, but that is not guaranteed. However, participation in this study may benefit children and adolescents with plaque psoriasis in the future.

Patients could also experience one or more side effects. Before beginning the study, the study staff will review all study-related risks and side effects with parents and patients.

Throughout their study participation, patients will be monitored closely. The sponsor of this study was required to design a protocol, which explains all study procedures. An independent review board responsible for patient safety reviewed this protocol, approved it, and requires that
it be followed exactly as written.

Who is eligible to participate in this study?
To be eligible for this study, patients must:

  • Be 12 to 17 years of age
  • Have been diagnosed with chronic plaque psoriasis for at least 6 months

All study-related visits, tests, and drugs will be provided at no cost. In addition, compensation for study-related travel may be provided.


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December 30, 2020 Clinical Trials

We know life with Hidradenitis Suppurativa isn’t always easy.

There are many unanswered questions surrounding the causes of HS and the painful and distressing symptoms it triggers in the body. With limited approved medical treatment options available, it’s important to keep looking for potential answers.

For this reason, the Ivy Clinical Research Study is investigating 3 different possible treatment options to assess the benefits each could offer to people with moderate to severe HS.

The Ivy Study may be an option for you if:*

  • you have a diagnosis of moderate to severe HS
  • you are 18 – 75 years of age
  • you have HS lesions in two different locations on your body

*There are other requirements for participation in the study. The study doctor will be able to explain these to you.


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December 29, 2020 Newsletter
According to the American Academy of Dermatology (AAD), more than 14 million people are living with rosacea. Most people who get rosacea are:
  • Between 30 and 50 years of age
  • Fair-skinned, and often have blonde hair and blue eyes
  • From Celtic or Scandinavian ancestry
  • Likely to have someone in their family tree with rosacea or severe acne
  • Likely to have had lots of acne — or acne cysts and/or nodules
Women are a bit more likely than men to get rosacea. Women, however, are not as likely as men to get severe rosacea. Some people are more likely to get rosacea, but anyone can get this skin disease. People of all colors get rosacea. Children get rosacea. It often begins with a tendency to blush or flush more easily than other people.
The redness can slowly spread beyond the nose and cheeks to the forehead and chin. Even the ears, chest, and back can be red all the time. Rosacea can cause more than redness. There are so many signs and symptoms that rosacea has four subtypes:
  1. Erythematotelangiectatic rosacea – Redness, flushing, visible blood vessels
  2. Papulopustular rosacea – Redness, swelling, and acne-like breakouts
  3. Phymatous rosacea – Skin thickens and has a bumpy texture
  4. Ocular rosacea – Eyes red and irritated, eyelids can be swollen, and the person may have what looks like a sty.
With time, people who have rosacea often see permanent redness in the center of their face. Some patients confuse symptoms of Acne with Rosacea.
Many things can trigger Rosacea outbursts. Things such as sun exposure, emotional stress, hot weather, wind, heavy exercise, alcohol consumption, hot baths, cold weather, spicy foods or a number of other factors can trigger Rosacea. When considering Rosacea triggers, the role of coffee and caffeine have been difficult to determine. Caffeine can vasoconstrict or shrink inflammation, possibly helping rosacea. Heat from a hot cup of coffee may cause vasodilation and make rosacea worse.
A recent study of data from the Nurses’ Health Study II that evaluated intake of coffee, tea, soda, and chocolate every 4 years in over 82,000 women shed some light on the role coffee may play (JAMA Dermatol. 2018 Dec 1;154[12]: 1394-1400). There were almost 5,000 cases of physician-diagnosed rosacea in the Study. When the investigators looked at caffeinated coffee consumption, the more caffeine and the more coffee they drank each day, the more likely it was for them not to have rosacea. Those who consumed four or more servings of caffeinated coffee a day had a significantly lower risk of rosacea, compared with those who consumed one or fewer servings per month.
But there was no significant association with decaffeinated coffee or with edibles that contained caffeine such as tea, soda, and chocolate. Something about caffeinated coffee seems to be protective for the development of rosacea.
One of the most prominent triggers for Rosacea is sun exposure. Even sun exposure coming through windows can cause Rosacea to flare. To prevent Rosacea flare-ups due to outdoor or indoor sun exposure, consider using a Topical sun-block. with zinc oxide over 6%. Topical sunblocks with zinc oxide over 6% can also often treat rosacea. Dr. Moore recommends products like Elta Clear, ISDIN Eryfotona, and Sente Pollution Shield (that also protects against pollution that can be a trigger).
Oral SUNISDIN includes ingredients that protect against sun-exposureVitamin A (as Beta-Carotene), Vitamin C (as Ascorbic Acid), Vitamin D3 (as Cholecalciferol), Vitamin E (as D-alpha Tocopherol), Selenium (as Sodium Selenite), Polypodium leucotomos Leaf Extract (Polypodium leucotomos L), Green Tea Leaf Extract (Camellia Sinensis (L) Kuntze), Grapeseed Extract (Vitis Vinifera), Lycopene, Lutein (Marigold Flower Extract) Other Ingredients: Sunflower Oil, Sunflower Lecithin, Maltodextrin, Dibasic Calcium Phosphate, Triglycerides, Starch, Arabic Gum, Yellow Beeswax, Medium Chain Triglycerides, Sodium Selenite. Inquire about this product in our office.
Dr. Moore provides a number of solutions for patients diagnosed with Rosacea. There are a number of prescription solutions as well as laser treatments that can reduce redness and minimize the appearance redness often accompanying Rosacea. See the December Special on Laser Treatment for Rosacea Below.
You may also qualify to participate in a Clinical Trial for Rosacea. For more information see your Arlington Center for Dermatology provider or call us at 817-795-7546 ext 339 or email us at studies@acderm.com.
Sources: AAD.org and Dermatology News February 2020

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